Strengths & Struggles in Schools & Society: Producing Critical and Creative Examinations of Intersectional Lives

Virtual Summit

You are invited to a 28-day virtual summit entitled, Strengths & Struggles in Schools & Society: Producing Critical and Creative Examinations of Intersectional Lives. This online event will run September 2-30. To register, for free, click here.

The team behind this project will then send you the interviews each day for your personal education and information. Please email Dr. Staples (, or Kim Scott (Summit Manager, with any questions you may have. Day 18 with link below is a video with Indira Bailey, high school art teacher now doctoral student at Penn State who interviewed Rogena Degge, Doug Blandy, Kristin Congdon, Jeanine Staples, and me two years ago about June King McFee, which is now published in Visual Arts Research.

Share this [registration link](( with friends and family as well. We all need to be in the know, now, more than ever. When you register, you will receive, in your inbox, one cutting-edge, social justice-oriented interview each day, for 28 days.

This event is for you if you answer “Yes!” to any of these questions:

  • Are you a student or scholar of race, gender, ability, orientations, identities, diversity, and/or social justice?
  • Are you an educator for critical studies, truth and reconciliation, and/or inclusive social contexts?
  • Are you an activist in these areas? Do you aspire to be?
  • Are you an administrator or executive leader in charge of diversity and inclusion initiatives for your academic institution?
  • Do you promote the evolution of schools and society within which many variations of people and experience actually live and learn?

If so, then you need to understand the strengths and struggles students with identities socially constructed as “marginal” (i.e. black, brown, indigenous, native, multitudinous, queer, woman, girl, trans, disabled, first generation, etc.) may cultivate throughout their lifespans.

Play this video about How Art Saves Lives on the Margins of School and Society.

Highlights of this session:

  • If you wonder how visual arts and art education assists the work of #BlackLivesMatter and #SayHerName, watch this interview.
  • There are two reasons Art Education is integral to social justice.
  • Educators! Administrators! Access this interview to hear three concrete ideas you can implement in your school or university curriculum to support art education for social justice.

Art education is Indira Bailey’s passion. She taught vocational technical high school art for sixteen years. As an art educator, Bailey has dedicated her career to understanding how art inspired youths in urban areas. She had received several Fulbright-Hayes Fellowships to South Africa, Morocco, and Japan researching how culture impacts art education. Bailey has received several national teacher fellowships, served on New Jersey DOE committees, and the finalist for New Jersey Teacher of the Year. Currently, Indira is examining the absence of Black women represented in art education and its implications in the K-12 art classroom.

Press play on this video and discover for yourself how to survive and thrive the strengths and struggles in school and society. This video interview is now available for FREE for the next 48 hours. And please, join the Facebook group! Gather with other students, scholars, and educators for discussion of this topic.

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