Advocacy

NAEA Position Statement on Distance Learning in Art Education

[Adopted March 2013; Reviewed and Revised March 2016]

NAEA believes distance learning is a viable and effective method of instruction. Distance art education encompasses both the use of e-learning technologies that support face-to-face instruction (such as blended, hybrid, or flipped classrooms) as well as those that substitute for face-to-face delivery. These technologies are beneficial in many settings including K-12, colleges, universities, museums, and community-based programs among others. Distance education is defined as “institution-based formal education where the learning group is separated and where interactive telecommunications systems are used to connect learners, resources and instructors” (Schlosser & Simonson, 2006, p. 1).

Distance art education can meet the diverse needs of today’s learner locally, as well as globally, making it accessible to a variety of students to accommodate individual learning styles and situations. Among those are students in alternative learning settings, home schools, home-bound for medical reasons, those in need of flexible scheduling, and students who prefer distance delivery of instruction.

When used in K-12 schools, colleges, universities, and museums, high quality, effective distance learning in art education includes and is supported by:

  • Distance educators who are knowledgeable in the primary concepts and structures of effective distance learning and are able to use a range of technologies, both existing and emerging, to effectively engage students in learning in the visual arts.
  • Having and using appropriate technology to accomplish its objectives and enable dynamic teaching and learning of the wide range of visual art curricula.
  • Evaluation of students using a variety of formative and summative assessment methods and technologies.
  • Ongoing revision of course design and instruction based on the feedback from students, peers, and self-reflection.
  • Technical support and training provided for students and teachers by the sponsoring institution.

NAEA believes that in the K12 setting, high quality, effective distance learning in art education also includes:

  • Curriculum aligned with local, state and national visual arts standards using multiple strategies and technologies to engage and assess authentic student learning.
  • Design and instruction by certified/licensed, highly-qualified art educators as defined by NAEA’s Professional Standards for Visual Arts Educators (NAEA, 2009).

Resources

Schlosser, L., & Simonson, M. (2006). Distance education: Definition and glossary of terms (2nd ed.). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. International Association for K-12 Online Learning. (2011). National standards for quality online teaching. Retrieved from http://www.inacol.org/

Southern Regional Education Board. (2006). Online teaching evaluation for state virtual schools. Retrieved from http://www.sreb.org/page/1405/education_policies.html

Southern Regional Education Board. (2006). Standards for quality online teaching. Retrieved from http://www.sreb.org/page/1405/education_policies.html

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